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cons

Rainbow Members
Jun 10, 2018
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Asexuality doesn't mean no sex ever! Although that is a popular usage. After a lot of thinking I decided my definition would be:

"Has a complicated relationship with sex characterized by atypical disinterest on one or more axes"

and that seems to cover all the usages I've seen :) It also reads a lot like *I* wrote it but well.

I turned asexual right after I started HRT, one of those post-HRT sexuality change things. It took me forever to believe I really was ace, that it wasn't just HRT killed my libido or dysphoria or something. Like I'm just about there 2.5 years later. But well I'm happy with it and I don't want to go back, never have, and that seems to be the trick.

This has been ace facts.
 

AudryLeigh

Rainbow Members
Sep 2, 2018
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I turned asexual right after I started HRT,
It is my understanding, which is well supported by research, that a person's sexuality is something they are born with. One of the rallying cries often repeated by LGBTQ+ people when trying to educate the general public is "It is NOT a choice." People discover their sexuality, but it doesn't change. Also, I'm curious, what lead to your starting hormone therapy, and is it being supervised by a qualified endocrinologist? Hormones effect a biological sex change from male to female, or from female to male, and the objective is to bring a person's biology into alignment with their gender. Most gender therapists and endocrinologists require a confirmed diagnosis of gender dysphoria, or other psychological indicator(s) that a person's biological sex is at odds with their gender. I have never heard of anyone else who sought out or was prescribed hormone therapy who didn't perceive their gender to be either male or female. I'm curious as to what your objective was in wanting to change your sex, if you are asexual. It seems as if any good gender therapist or endocrinologist would have determined that, before prescribing hormone therapy.

Also, you might want to proof read your post, as your definition reads, "characterized by atypical disinterest on one or more axes."
 

Codeawayhaley

Moderator
Staff member
May 6, 2018
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1@AudryLeigh[/USER]

Sexuality is a bit more flexible than "you are born with it", while it tends to be stable over long periods of time it can drift, and/or shift suddenly but I think the important thing is that it's not a choice it is much more deeply encoded in the brain. While no definitive genes have been found it is likely that like sexual differentiation which has a network of genes that modify the expression of other genes to give quite varied outcome, sexuality likely has some genetic component as well which is then built on by epigenetics (modulating gene expression via methylation, acetylation, and phophorylation of the nucleotide bases and histone proteins), and neural changes over ones life.

1@cons[/USER]

 I would probably change it to "disinterest in sex or lack sexual attraction which hold stable over time" however my definition doesn't define forms of gray asexuality (such as demisexuality) so it could do with some more work. It is probably easier to define traits of sexuality in the same way we categorise personality as a multidimensional graph with each axis representing a continuum of a particular aspect due to the complex relationship between different aspects, however it may make it more difficult for the average person to get what is meant.

 

AudryLeigh

Rainbow Members
Sep 2, 2018
26
13
0
sexuality likely has some genetic component as well which is then built on by epigenetics (modulating gene expression via methylation, acetylation, and phophorylation of the nucleotide bases and histone proteins), and neural changes over ones life.
that's pretty detailed, and far from common knowledge. Just curious, are you a biochemist? 
 

Codeawayhaley

Moderator
Staff member
May 6, 2018
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Just curious, are you a biochemist?  
Neuroinformatician (academic focuses: Neuroscience, & Genetics and Genetic Disorders).

Neuroinformatics is where computer science meets medical science (bioinformatics), and is also part of neuropsychology. We design software tools, and process data associated with the various levels of information that allow the nervous system to work.
 
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AudryLeigh

Rainbow Members
Sep 2, 2018
26
13
0
WOW! Back in the day, I was a high-level computer programmer, working (under contract) for the US and other Free World governments. What I did lived in the deep dark reaches of government underground, and was highly classified. What you do sounds even more complex than what I did. You must have a pretty extensive education, I'm impressed. I come from a time when all the best programmers were self taught -- the academic world was still struggling with how to teach the skills. I was essentially a glorified hacker, hacking for the highest levels of government, military, security, and "black-ops" agencies.

Audry
 
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